Loading... Please wait...

Our Newsletter


Define Kinds of Water

Artesian water-

Artesian water or spring water flows from the ground naturally without the aid of drilling or pumping. It is the only distinction from any other sources of water.

Bidest water-

The distilling of water that has already been distilled, or “double-distilled water”, is the standard for highly purified water used in biochemistry and trace analysis laboratories. Not as common as it used to be, labortories now use a combination of water purifcations methods to accomplish the same objective.

Carbonated water-

Water containing dissolved carbon dioxide is carbonated. It is also known as soda water or sparkling water. This kind of water can occur naturally in the presents of limestone or other carbonate rocks. Commonly carbon dioxide is artificially added to water under pressure.

Deionized water-

Deionized water uses an ion-exchange process, which removes both positive ions, such as calcium and sodium, and negative ions, such as chlorides and bicarbonates. It is sometimes called de-mineralized water.

De-mineralized water-

De-mineralized water uses an ion-exchange process, which removes both positive ions, such as calcium and sodium, and negative ions, such as chlorides and bicarbonates. It is often called deionized water.

Distilled water-

Distilled water is condensed steam. This process leaves water in it’s purest but its most unstable form. The water is naturally aggressive in seeking to combine with other minerals and organics. It is recommended to transport distilled water in glass or stainless steel, as the water will pick up the taste of its container. Taking advantage of this trait by putting nourishment in the water, such as a couple of grains of rice can help stabilization.

Double-distilled water-

The distilling of water that has already been distilled, or “Bidest water”, is the standard for highly purified water used in biochemistry and trace analysis labortories. Not as common as it used to be, labortories now use a combination of water purifcations methods to accomplish the same objective.

Hard water-

Hard water is a relative term for high amounts of calcium and magnesium salts. Hard water does not allow soap to fully develop suds causing the formation of soap curds. Further, temporarily hard water contains bicarbonates of calcium and/or magnesium, which when heated form scale noticeable in hot water heaters and cooking pans. Permanently hard water contains sulphates, chlorides, or nitrates of calcium and/or magnesium, which are not affected by heating.

Mineral water-

Water containing large quantities of dissolved minerals is “mineral” water. There are five main classes of mineral water. They are alkaline, ferrunginous, saline, sulphurous and potable.

Alkaline – contains a high concentration of salts. These salts change the pH of the water to a range of 7.2 to 9.5. (7 are a neutral pH, lower are acid, and higher are alkaline).

Ferrunginous – contains high amounts of iron. The water has a rusty coloration.

Potable – water containing less than 500 TDS (total dissolved solids) measured in parts per million. Often this is a standard for specialty-bottled drinking water.

Saline – contains high amount of sodium or magnesium sulphates or sodium chloride.

Sulphurous – contains high amounts of dissolved sulphur compounds and smells of rotten eggs.

Municipal water-

Tap water or municipal water is water purified and treated for public distribution and safety. Treatment of the water includes the killing of harmful bacteria, removing sediments, and eliminating objectionable odors. Often municipalities add chlorine and other additives like fluoride for a variety of reasons.

Pure water-

Pure water consists of the chemical compound H2O (hydrogen and oxygen) alone, but this kind of purity does not truly exist. Water is so unstable in this configuration; it seeks out other compounds, organic or mineral, with which to combine.

Purified water-

Purified water is a very loose term for any kind and type of attempt to make water cleaner than before. From using a sieve to remove dirt and pebbles, to a filter on the tap water, to condensing steam, all are attempts to purify water.

Reverse osmosis water-

Reverse osmosis or RO is a purification process using pressure to force water through a membrane that retains solids on one side and allows the pure water to pass to the other side. This process can produce water that is stable with a TDS (total dissolved solids) of less than 10 parts per million.

Soda water –

Water containing dissolved carbon dioxide is soda water.   It is also known as sparking water or carbonated water. This kind of water can occur naturally in the presents of limestone or other carbonate rocks. Commonly carbon dioixide is artificially added to water under pressure.

Soft water-

Soft water contains relatively low amounts of calcium and magnesium salts. Properties of soft water include its ability to allow full development of soap and detergents.

Softened water-

Softened water is hard water that had been treated to remove calcium and magnesium salts. However, softened water usually is high in sodium chloride.

Sparking water –

Water containing dissolved carbon dioxide is sparkling water.   It is also known as soda water or carbonated water. This kind of water can occur naturally in the presents of limestone or other carbonate rocks. Commonly carbon dioxide is artificially added to water under pressure.

Spring water-

Spring water or artesian water flows from the ground naturally without the aid of drilling or pumping. It is the only distinction from any other sources of water.

Tap water-

Municipal water or “tap” water is water purified and treated for public distribution and safety. Treatment of the water includes the killing of harmful bacteria, removing sediments, and eliminating objectionable odors. Often municipalities add chlorine and other additives like fluoride for a variety of reasons.